Sunday, 9 April 2017

I Wanted To Show You . . . .


. . . but you weren’t there. O to be able to share the wonders of Spring I cannot fail to see, no matter how blurred by tears my vision is. Let Wordsworth speak for me.:

Surprised by Joy

Surprised by joy—impatient as the Wind 
I turned to share the transport—Oh! with whom 
But Thee, long buried in the silent Tomb, 
That spot which no vicissitude can find? 
Love, faithful love, recalled thee to my mind— 
But how could I forget thee?—Through what power, 
Even for the least division of an hour, 
Have I been so beguiled as to be blind 
To my most grievous loss!—That thought’s return 
Was the worst pang that sorrow ever bore, 
Save one, one only, when I stood forlorn, 
Knowing my heart’s best treasure was no more; 
That neither present time, nor years unborn 
Could to my sight that heavenly face restore. 


35 comments:

  1. Don't you love how poetry can cut to chase of being human. This is a wonderful poem
    Thinking of you ....glad you have your garden and poems to bring you surprising joy

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  2. Sometimes it is the old-fashioned poems with their old-fashioned phrases that best capture the feelings of today. I'm so sorry for your loss, Friko.

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  3. This poem captures feelings of loss perfectly...Hugs to you.

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  4. You are in my heart always U

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  5. I'm so glad, now, that the nuns drummed all that poetry into our heads! These days learning poems by rote seems to have fallen from grace, but it is lovely, in various life situations, like your present one, to have appropriate lines from long ago pop into your head. God bless Mr. Wordsworth and his ilk. This brought tears to my eyes....And God bless you too Friko as you come to terms with your loss.

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  6. lovely garden, lovely poem. lonely garden, lonely poem. one letter changed. one person changed. thinking of you.

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  7. Truly amazing how you are so adept at producing exactly the right vehicle to convey your thoughts and feelings!
    Sympathy and hugs for you, dear Lady. Thank you for sharing, and allowing us to share.

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  8. Sending lots and lots of love.

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  9. ... sometimes i take out this lil teeny tiny Jenny box with the lil teeny tiny pink sleeper in it and i look at it, touch it, hug it, wipe my tears with it ... she would be 31 ... Thinking of you, friend Friko ... Love, cat.

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  10. The ability to perceive beauty even through blurred eyes, yes to that and so much more. Life is so precious and so darn stunningly beautiful, despite it all. Take heart, be good to yourself, much love to you.

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  11. special thoughts
    continue
    from miles away,,,,

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  12. Thank you, dear Friko, for allowing us to see your garden and this poem, and some of your thoughts. xo

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  13. I hope you find comfort for your loss in pieces of writing like Wordsworths.

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  14. Thank you for a glimpse into your lovely garden and into your saddened heart. That poem says so much, so eloquently.

    Love, hugs & prayers ~ FlowerLady

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  15. Heartfelt condolences for your loss; and please know how much we appreciate your beautiful and poignant writing about his passage.

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  16. Your garden and the poem are beautiful. I am so sorry for your great loss.

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  17. Your garden is lovely. Grief is a strange emotion everyone grieves in their own way :(

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  18. It breaks my heart that old poem does every time I read it. It captures the pain and emptiness and the jolts of unexpected joy.

    Thank you Friko. May his undying spirit comfort you.

    XO
    WWW

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  19. The garden is beautiful, as is the poem, as are you. In beauty is strength. I am thinking of you --as are we all.

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  20. Dear Friko - such a wonderful looking garden, such a glorious man - my heart goes out to you ... as you so rightly say Beloved would have leant up on you and confirmed your thoughts ... just beautiful. So sad and so challenging these firsts ... I feel for you - big hugs and much love Hilary

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  21. Lovely scene so fitting for the poem you share. Caring thoughts for you through these days ahead.

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  22. Wordsworth exquisitely captured the depth of loss. If you didn't have such a love you wouldn't feel such a loss. Believe it or not, I envy you. Hugs to you.

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  23. Rita said it all for me. I envy you too....such love shared...so fortunate you are

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  24. Poetry can be such a healer, I feel for you and your grief.

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  25. I am glad you are seeing a beautiful spring. You deserve this after a challenging winter of heartbreak. This poem goes to the very heart and soul of love and loss, doesn't it? Wrapping my arms around you across the pond.

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  26. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing this, showing this . . . grief knows no bounds, but, poetry helps us through it.

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  27. In all your sadness you are fortunate to have these wonderful memories of times full of shared love, music, theater, literature, nature, a glass of wine in the evening, poetry too, and dog love, and dog walks... I think even your garden speaks of it. How sweet you called him "Beloved" - no doubt he must have loved you too!In these memories he lives on... Can this comfort you a bit?

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  28. The way nature just keeps going, no matter what happens in our own lives, can be exasperating and comforting at the same time.

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  29. Dear Friko, I have greatly enjoyed so many of your posts over the years - your humour, your frankness and honesty, your writing talent, the ups and downs of life in Valley's End and more recently how humble I feel to have shared in yours and beloved's last months. I am so very very sorry for your loss and my heartfelt thoughts go with you in the days to come. Rose.

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  30. Last night, I attended a meeting where the presentation was given by an expert on plant propagation: particularly, prairie plants. I was astonished to learn that some of my favorites have tap roots that grow six and eight feet into the earth. Because of that, they're able to withstand every sort of predation: freezes, over-grazing, fire. The blossoms and leaves may disappear, but the root remains, and it will come back, without fail. You're equally well-grounded, rooted in love in so many ways, including love of your "place" and its lovely gardens. You'll come back, too -- perhaps even stronger. The garden is such a wonderful metaphor for the truths of the poem.

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  31. God gives us spring flowers to blur the memory of winter and to brighten our hopes....my prayers to you. Just remember he who lives on in our hearts is not lost.

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