Monday, 30 January 2012

Homegrown Pearl of Wisdom - Our World




There are times
when following the evidence of your own eyes
is not only much less costly,






but also helps you to avoid
getting stuck.






This is my contribution to Our World
Go and have a look at the others.


39 comments:

  1. Great post for the day, Friko! And that is indeed a narrow street! Love your captures!

    Sylvia

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  2. Engaging post!



    Warm Aloha from Waikiki
    Comfort Spiral

    > < } } ( ° >

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  3. Roads built for cyclists or horseback riders I guess. Good pictures.

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  4. Glad I don't have to drive down those streets. Just discovered your site and I love it. Makes me want to visit England. I'll be back often

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  5. More a doorway than a passageway for vehicles. NOTHING and NOWHERE looks like this in the USA.

    I checked out some of the sites on Our World. What a cool blogspot!

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  6. I love Europe and the British Isles for hanging on to such stuff!

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  7. Veneer of ordinariness...if you happen to be on a bike, otherwise..

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  8. I think someone may have to "give way" occasionally!

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  9. As we say in Appalachia, that'll put you between a rock and a hard place. Jim

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  10. Friko, without you, I would never have seen this road or sign, or chuckled about how SatNav tech might engage with vintage passageways.

    Your words and photos are the business!

    xo

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  11. I've never seen such narrow roads -- or more interesting, lovely pictures!

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  12. I believe my VW would scoot right through that lovely little alley. I had a tiny little Fiat 500 years ago and it barely fit in some of the alleyways of ancient Ancona, Italy, but it was a blast blasting through them.
    There is an old Spanish village over here in the colonies, St. Augustine, Florida, that has a few of the narrow little alleys found in Europe. These days they are pedestrian only as no modern vehicle will fit through them, not even the new horse-drawn carriages.

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  13. I love the "No Sat Nav". So modern. Might as well say "Look up, you moron!"

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  14. That looks like a 'bikes only' street. Is it near your home?

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  15. Very narrow street/road designed for walkers, push bike riders, motor bikes or horse and cart from days gone by, anything bigger and you're in real trouble :-).

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  16. When we drove in the UK some years ago, my husband clipped the side mirror against the side mirror of a parked car on a street only slightly wider than this. He paid more attention after that.

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  17. How amazing. I am so grateful that you shared this. It is just beautiful. Thank you. (and I love the no Sat Nav sign).

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  18. My solution to the problem is stilts.

    If there is no problem, then no stilts.

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  19. Long before the days of SatNav, I regularly drove an 8 ton lorry through the narrow streets of Cornish towns and villages. We were once asked by a tourist, if he could sit in the cab and film as we negotiated our way through Fowey...with less than an inch to spare in places.

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  20. Oh, how I miss those lovely narrow lanes! Lovely shots.

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  21. Every time I visit your blog I am enchanted by your photo, with the ruin.
    These narrow roads (can they truly be called roads?) remind me of the Dorothy L Sayers novels, and the descriptions of Harriet Vane being terrified by Lord Peter Wimsey's very fast driving. There cannot have been much traffic....

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  22. Liked the rejection of Satnav. After she once led me onto a motorway bridge which was for police car use only, I was never seduced by her charms again.

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  23. Great photos, Friko, and I can think of a few streets locally which should have a No Satnav sign on them.

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  24. Love this. I love the idea that these little lanes have looked pretty much the same for a long, long, long time.

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  25. I hold my breath on narrow lanes hoping for an abundance of passing places . . .

    I like the SatNav sign.

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  26. I could do with a pedestrian's SatNav . Having no sense of direction at all , I'd find it rather handy when exploring strange cities .

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  27. Love the photos!! And what an analogy to life!!
    I have been "stuck" more times than I care to remember!! Ha!
    Hugs
    SueAnn

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  28. We don't see many scenes like this here. Such good navigational guidance!

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  29. England hat doch grosse Aehnlichkeit mit Deutschland, wenn ich mir Deine Bilder so ansehe. Sehr schön, bei euch scheint auch alles so still, zumindest hat man den Eindruck, wenn man die Fotos ansieht.
    Dir einen schönen Abend und bis bald!
    Renée

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  30. OMGosh! That first one looks like a bicycle path! ;)

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  31. From time to time while driving in England, we very nearly became stuck in one of those narrow passageways. Scenic but hard on the paint as well as the nerves. Probably a life lesson here too. Dianne

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  32. a decent paper map and a bit of common sense come into their own too.

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  33. Ha! Good one, Friko. The "Don't believe your SatNav" warning is a classic!

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  34. Perfect! The photos are lovely and the advice is great.

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